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The Children’s Innovation Project – Building Blocks of Learning

This month WQED Multimedia’s Learning Innovation initiative highlights the “Children’s Innovation Project.” This unique educational program began as collaboration between Pittsburgh Allegheny K-5 kindergarten teacher Melissa Butler and Jeremy Boyle, a resident artist with CMU’s CREATE Lab. The two wanted to engage young children in broad critical learning with a focus on exploration, expression and innovation with technology.

The project began in Melissa’s kindergarten class in 2010. Melissa and Jeremy created simple components -- at first, elementary circuit blocks -- that these very young students could use to learn about electricity and circuitry. With these components the children learn to make connections to objects in their own world, by exploring the insides of their toys and common household items like radios, telephones and small computers. In taking both simple and complex technological devices apart and reconfiguring them into something new, they also develop their skills in vocabulary, writing, art, mathematics and social studies.

According to Jeremy, “We’re very interested in thinking about having an active relationship with technology, rather than just passive.” Adds Melissa: “As a project of the CREATE Lab, we’re interested in technological fluency much beyond technological literacy. We want active engagement, having children understand how technology works and how they can be creators of technology, not just users of it.”

Pilot funding for the project came from SPARK, a program of The Sprout Fund. But the project has really taken off: partners now include Carlow University School of Education, whose graduate students regularly observe and participate; ASSET STEM Education, The Fred Rogers Center at St. Vincent College, the Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, and others. Children’s Innovation Project is part of the Kids+Creativity network.

“We work with children to think about their habits of learning, and we work with teachers to think about their practices of teaching and learning, and so the project has become a partnership with many people in Pittsburgh who are thinking about what technology means and what learning means,” Melissa explains.

“Children will be likely to become engineers from the work here, but they’re just as likely to become a philosopher, a writer, an artist, anything,” Jeremy adds.

To learn more about the Children’s Innovation Project: info@CIPPGH.org

Other Resources:
Remake Learning
CREATE Lab
POP City Feature

Avonworth Middle School is a “School to Watch”

Avonworth Middle School has been redesignated for a second time as a "Pennsylvania Don Eichhorn Schools: School to Watch." The Middle School was first designated as a School to Watch in 2009 and received its first re-designation in 2012. The Schools to Watch program recognizes schools achieving academic excellence, based on criteria established by the National Forum to Accelerate Middle Grades Reform.

Middle School principal Mike Hall acknowledged, “We are thrilled to receive our second redesignation as a Schools to Watch school. The entire STW process pushes us to continually look for ways to improve while keeping the developmental needs of middle school students a top priority.”

Middle school administrators and staff members were recognized at the Pennsylvania Association for Middle Level Education State Conference in February. A recognition celebration will also be held at the school this spring, and in June the middle school will be recognized at the National Schools to Watch Conference. Avonworth Middle School is one of only seven schools in Pennsylvania to be re-designated twice.

Photos



A robotics project at Ellis School combined art and technology.



Participating in a design challenge are these Avonworth High School students. Photo by Norton Gusky.



Demond Briston and A'mon Rice participate in SLB Radio's 2014 Crossing Fences program at The Kingsley Association in East Liberty. Photograph courtesy SLB Radio Productions, Inc.



Participating in the recent Future Cities Competition were these Propel students.



WQED Cameraman Walt Francis photographs these YMCA Lighthouse students as they make beautiful music – digitally.



Ellis students respond to a recent “Design Challenge.” Norton Gusky photo.



McKeesport Propel students love science!



Sekou Brown, Damani Brown and Ross Tedder hold their published books at the celebration party for Crossing Fences: East Liberty Voices at The Kingsley Association. Photograph courtesy SLB Radio Productions, Inc.

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featured specials


  • WQED is pleased to partner with Highmark to bring you these special reports on "Men & Cancer" and "Women & Cancer." Every year cancer claims the lives of nearly 300,000 men in America. According to the American Cancer Society, getting the facts about cancer is an important step in taking care of your overall health.

featured specials


  • WQED is pleased to partner with Highmark to bring you these special reports on "Men & Cancer" and "Women & Cancer." Every year cancer claims the lives of nearly 300,000 men in America. According to the American Cancer Society, getting the facts about cancer is an important step in taking care of your overall health.

featured specials


  • WQED is pleased to partner with Highmark to bring you these special reports on "Men & Cancer" and "Women & Cancer." Every year cancer claims the lives of nearly 300,000 men in America. According to the American Cancer Society, getting the facts about cancer is an important step in taking care of your overall health.

featured specials

  • WQED is pleased to partner with Highmark to bring you these special reports on "Men & Cancer" and "Women & Cancer." Every year cancer claims the lives of nearly 300,000 men in America. According to the American Cancer Society, getting the facts about cancer is an important step in taking care of your overall health.

this month



  • View a special selection of WQED productions about women during the month of March.