WQED mobile
    menu
    close menu

The Children’s Innovation Project – Building Blocks of Learning

This month WQED Multimedia’s Learning Innovation initiative highlights the “Children’s Innovation Project.” This unique educational program began as collaboration between Pittsburgh Allegheny K-5 kindergarten teacher Melissa Butler and Jeremy Boyle, a resident artist with CMU’s CREATE Lab. The two wanted to engage young children in broad critical learning with a focus on exploration, expression and innovation with technology.

The project began in Melissa’s kindergarten class in 2010. Melissa and Jeremy created simple components -- at first, elementary circuit blocks -- that these very young students could use to learn about electricity and circuitry. With these components the children learn to make connections to objects in their own world, by exploring the insides of their toys and common household items like radios, telephones and small computers. In taking both simple and complex technological devices apart and reconfiguring them into something new, they also develop their skills in vocabulary, writing, art, mathematics and social studies.

According to Jeremy, “We’re very interested in thinking about having an active relationship with technology, rather than just passive.” Adds Melissa: “As a project of the CREATE Lab, we’re interested in technological fluency much beyond technological literacy. We want active engagement, having children understand how technology works and how they can be creators of technology, not just users of it.”

Pilot funding for the project came from SPARK, a program of The Sprout Fund. But the project has really taken off: partners now include Carlow University School of Education, whose graduate students regularly observe and participate; ASSET STEM Education, The Fred Rogers Center at St. Vincent College, the Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, and others. Children’s Innovation Project is part of the Kids+Creativity network.

“We work with children to think about their habits of learning, and we work with teachers to think about their practices of teaching and learning, and so the project has become a partnership with many people in Pittsburgh who are thinking about what technology means and what learning means,” Melissa explains.

“Children will be likely to become engineers from the work here, but they’re just as likely to become a philosopher, a writer, an artist, anything,” Jeremy adds.

To learn more about the Children’s Innovation Project: info@CIPPGH.org

Other Resources:
Remake Learning
CREATE Lab
POP City Feature

Remake Learning: A Forum on Education

WQED-TV will be focusing on the area’s innovations in education in a special half hour show set to air Thursday, April 9 at 8 p.m.

Hosted by Tonia Caruso, the show will feature four panelists – Michelle King, teacher at The Environmental Charter School at Frick Park; Nina Barbuto, creator of Assemble; Stan Thompson, education program director at the Heinz Endowments and Anne Sekula, director of the Remake Learning Council.

The conversation will focus on how regional schools and organizations are using digital media and STEAM learning among other methods to enhance the educational experience for children and how partnerships with universities and foundations are playing a major role.

Specific topics of discussion will include: *an explanation of what STEAM stands for and how schools are using it; *why hands-on learning, problem solving and collaboration are so important; *how the combination of schools, after-school programs and other organizations are all important in the overall education experience for children; *the role local foundations are playing to help schools create, implement and fund new education strategies, and how universities are getting involved.

The show is being produced by Maria Kakay. For more information, visit our website: WQED.org

Photos



Former Pittsburgh Steeler and current ESPN commentator Merril Hoge recently spoke to Avonworth High School students. It was part of A Student’s Healthy Road to Success, sponsored by Allegheny Health Network.



Speaking with Avonworth High School student and Pittsburgh Steeler fan David Mucha is former Steeler Merril Hoge.



Fort Cherry 6th graders created an interactive art exhibit using Scratch and two Hummingbird projects, DaVinci models and interactive edifices.



Sixth Graders from Fort Cherry use Cubelets to create an interactive art exhibit.



Teams from Propel Braddock Hills High School and McKeesport’s Afterschool program cooked with their professional chef in a professional kitchen at the Pittsburgh Public Market. They’re preparing for the “Farm to Table” Conference competition.



Propel McKeesport students Tyrreck Wright, Savannah Mazzochetti and Zoe Gibson learn about knife safety and chopping skills from Tom Samilson, Manager of Outreach and Education, at Community Kitchen Pittsburgh.

Made Possible By:

featured specials


  • WQED is pleased to partner with Highmark to bring you these special reports on "Men & Cancer" and "Women & Cancer." Every year cancer claims the lives of nearly 300,000 men in America. According to the American Cancer Society, getting the facts about cancer is an important step in taking care of your overall health.

featured specials


  • WQED is pleased to partner with Highmark to bring you these special reports on "Men & Cancer" and "Women & Cancer." Every year cancer claims the lives of nearly 300,000 men in America. According to the American Cancer Society, getting the facts about cancer is an important step in taking care of your overall health.

featured specials


  • WQED is pleased to partner with Highmark to bring you these special reports on "Men & Cancer" and "Women & Cancer." Every year cancer claims the lives of nearly 300,000 men in America. According to the American Cancer Society, getting the facts about cancer is an important step in taking care of your overall health.

featured specials

  • WQED is pleased to partner with Highmark to bring you these special reports on "Men & Cancer" and "Women & Cancer." Every year cancer claims the lives of nearly 300,000 men in America. According to the American Cancer Society, getting the facts about cancer is an important step in taking care of your overall health.