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The Children’s Innovation Project – Building Blocks of Learning

This month WQED Multimedia’s Learning Innovation initiative highlights the “Children’s Innovation Project.” This unique educational program began as collaboration between Pittsburgh Allegheny K-5 kindergarten teacher Melissa Butler and Jeremy Boyle, a resident artist with CMU’s CREATE Lab. The two wanted to engage young children in broad critical learning with a focus on exploration, expression and innovation with technology.

The project began in Melissa’s kindergarten class in 2010. Melissa and Jeremy created simple components -- at first, elementary circuit blocks -- that these very young students could use to learn about electricity and circuitry. With these components the children learn to make connections to objects in their own world, by exploring the insides of their toys and common household items like radios, telephones and small computers. In taking both simple and complex technological devices apart and reconfiguring them into something new, they also develop their skills in vocabulary, writing, art, mathematics and social studies.

According to Jeremy, “We’re very interested in thinking about having an active relationship with technology, rather than just passive.” Adds Melissa: “As a project of the CREATE Lab, we’re interested in technological fluency much beyond technological literacy. We want active engagement, having children understand how technology works and how they can be creators of technology, not just users of it.”

Pilot funding for the project came from SPARK, a program of The Sprout Fund. But the project has really taken off: partners now include Carlow University School of Education, whose graduate students regularly observe and participate; ASSET STEM Education, The Fred Rogers Center at St. Vincent College, the Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, and others. Children’s Innovation Project is part of the Kids+Creativity network.

“We work with children to think about their habits of learning, and we work with teachers to think about their practices of teaching and learning, and so the project has become a partnership with many people in Pittsburgh who are thinking about what technology means and what learning means,” Melissa explains.

“Children will be likely to become engineers from the work here, but they’re just as likely to become a philosopher, a writer, an artist, anything,” Jeremy adds.

To learn more about the Children’s Innovation Project: info@CIPPGH.org

Other Resources:
Remake Learning
CREATE Lab
POP City Feature

Hundreds Gather For Maker Party

Kids across Pittsburgh have been spending their summer learning through many new and exciting programs at area schools, cultural institutions, educational organizations and more. They recently celebrated their “summer of learning” at the Second Annual Pittsburgh Maker Party, held at the Society of Contemporary Craft in the Strip District.

A few hundred kids and their parents joined educators from Hive Pittsburgh, the Kids+Creativity Network, the Warhol Museum, TechShop, MAKESHOP and Sprout Fund staff at the party, which featured hands-on activities, food and music and learning stations where attendees checked out programs and projects from the Digital Corps, Pittsburgh City of Learning and Hive Pittsburgh.

Among the events: making seed bombs with Gardweeno; blasting away with marshmallow launchers built with inventors from TechShop, creating mini-videos with Steeltown Entertainment staff, and learning the science behind screen printing with educators from The Warhol Museum.

This was the culminating activity of the Pgh City of Learning Summer Campaign, highlighting how important (and fun) summer learning and engagement is for youth before they head back to school in the fall. It also highlighted opportunities to bridge the arts and technology through programs that appeal to, and address the needs of, youngsters.

Media Partnership Focuses on Learning Innovation

WQED Multimedia and our media partners, 90.5 WESA, Pittsburgh Magazine and NEXTpittsburgh have been focusing on Learning Innovation for the past months, and have put the media spotlight on everything from innovations in Early Childhood learning to computer science, STEAM and robotics.

The four media outlets, TV, radio, magazine and online magazine, are working together to focus on Pittsburgh leadership in the international movement to “remake learning” and create educational opportunities designed for our times.

Made possible through a grant from the Grable Foundation, Learning Innovation focuses on the Pittsburgh region's need to prepare its young people for college and the work force by building on the basics and connecting students with hands-on learning experiences that develop relevant skills.

Look for new stories, videos and content every month, on WQED-TV, iQ Kids Radio, and on WQED Interactive, and visit our partners at WESA, Pittsburgh Magazine and NEXTpittsburgh.

Photos



The Remake Learning Digital Corps have been busy connecting digital learning experts with afterschool program providers. These youngsters in Homestead are increasing their digital literacy.



Checking out a possible shot is this student in Pittsburgh Filmmakers Youth Media Program’s summer Directors’ Workshop.



A student discusses his film storyboard with Pittsburgh Filmmakers Youth Media Program Director Susan Howard, standing.



Students from Clairton and the Wilkinsburg afterschool group, FUSE, have been participating in Hear Me 101, workshops that develop writing, technical communication and media literacy skills. Students create short documentaries that explore issues of importance to them. Pittsburgh Filmmakers Youth Media Program provides help with much of the project.



Youth from Homewood explore the digital world with help from mentors from the Remake Learning Digital Corps.



Hundreds of educators attended FlipCon 14 in Mars. Here Aaron Sams, one of the leaders in the Flipped Learning Movement, shares his thoughts. Norton Gusky photo.



Young learners enjoy time on computers at one of assemble’s summer camps.



Making things the old fashioned way at an assemble summer camp.



“Making” is going to be a big part of the curriculum from K-12 at Avonworth Schools. Here teachers are learning how to include making and design into their classes.



Avonworth Schools have been working with the Children’s Museum MAKESHOP on integrating making into all areas of school curriculum. They received help in a brainstorming session from Maya for Human-Centered Design staff.

Spread The News

Do you have a story of learning innovation? A program, teacher or parent who is making a difference? Tell us about it and we’ll share it on our Learning Innovation webpage. Submit stories and videos to learning@wqed.org!

Made Possible By:

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