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Upcoming TV Highlights

Saturday, April 30, 2016 at 9:00pm
The National Parks: America's Best Idea

THE NATIONAL PARKS: AMERICA'S BEST IDEA is a six-episode series produced by Ken Burns and Dayton Duncan and written by Dayton Duncan. Filmed over the course of more than six years at some of nature's most spectacular locales – from Acadia to Yosemite, Yellowstone to the Grand Canyon, the Everglades of Florida to the Gates of the Arctic in Alaska - THE NATIONAL PARKS: AMERICA'S BEST IDEA is nonetheless a story of people: people from every conceivable background – rich and poor; famous and unknown; soldiers and scientists; natives and newcomers; idealists, artists and entrepreneurs; people who were willing to devote themselves to saving some precious portion of the land they loved, and in doing so reminded their fellow citizens of the full meaning of democracy.

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Tuesday, May 3, 2016 at 8:00pm
American Masters: Janis Joplin

American Masters – Janis: Little Girl Blue premieres nationwide as part of the 30th anniversary season of THIRTEEN’s American Masters series. The broadcast features a never-before-seen extended film cut with additional archival performance footage and new interviews with Joplin’s sister Laura Joplin and musicians influenced by Janis: Alecia Moore (a.k.a. Pink), Juliette Lewis, Melissa Etheridge and the film’s narrator, Chan Marshall, who is best known as indie rock star Cat Power. In tribute, she performs “A Woman Left Lonely” from Joplin’s final studio album Pearl, released posthumously on January 11, 1971. This year marks the album’s 45th anniversary.

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Wednesday, May 4, 2016 at 9:00pm
NOVA: Operation Lighthouse Rescue

Engineers strive to save Gay Head Lighthouse, an historic landmark on Martha's Vineyard that is threatened by the persistent erosion of the cliffs upon which it rests.

Friday, May 6, 2016 at 9:00pm
Jazz: Dedicated to Chaos (1940-1945)

Dedicated to Chaos” (Part 7 of 10) covers the years 1940-45, when Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie burst onto the jazz scene with their “new way of playing.” Meanwhile, Duke Ellington had found a new collaborator, Billy Strayhorn. And swing endured; its hits, says narrator Keith David, became “the anthems of wartime America.” And around the world? “Jazz,” says Dave Brubeck, “is accepted as the music of freedom.”