On a trip to India, Pittsburgh artist Laurel Herman was thunderstruck by the plight of the country's 10 million homeless dogs. She returned to Pittsburgh with dramatic video, and the stories of amazing animal welfare advocates.


OnQ continues its series on education reform, "Making the Grade," with a profile of the Extra Mile Foundation, which sends low-income students to four Catholic inner city schools in the Pittsburgh area.


The flowers are back! OnQ contributor Doug Oster takes us inside Phipps Conservatory to show us the lush flower filled rooms, the cascading waterfalls, and the vibrant colors of the spring flower show.


It's hard to believe anyone would vandalize the historic monuments at Gettysburg National Military Park - but when it happens, there's a small army ready to pick up the pieces. This short feature from writer/producer David Solomon and videographer/editor Paul Ruggieri is culled from the longer documentary, Stone Soldiers: Saving the Gettysburg Monuments.


There is more in your garden than plants and soil. The opportunity for renewed mental and physical health grows there, too.


State research showing Pennsylvania's health care system in "critical condition." OnQ shows how the average small business in this region - and its employees - are affected by the rising costs of healthcare.


The Indian Cultural Association of Pittsburgh was the first Asian Indian school in the Pittsburgh region to educate Indian students about their rich heritage and cultural values. Class meets in the North Hills on Sunday with entire families participating in prayers, language and culture.


She was a mother, community activist and advocate for troubled children and their parents. But at age 58, Judith Neely's life was cut short by a fatal car accident at Beaver Valley Mall in December 2007. OnQ shows how the life, dreams and hopes of this Aliquippa native affected so many.


Cancer specialists call it a rare event. Doctors in Pittsburgh have never seen it until now. Two biological sisters struck with the same form of childhood cancer.


A field of dreams has become a reality for thousands of families in Western Pennsylvania at a brand new sports complex in Cranberry Township that includes a baseball stadium designed for children with special needs. There are nearly 100,000 children in the Pittsburgh region identified as having special needs. This sparkling new baseball field will allow these children to play America's favorite pastime without boundaries. OnQ contributor Mike Clark attended the emotional opening day festivities, as many children stepped up to the plate for the first time.


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